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770 Results

  • Learning Module: Smarter Grantmaking (Principle: Narrow the Power Gap)

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This learning module explores the variety of ways grants managers can take steps to improve their organization’s grantmaking practices, with a particular focus on supporting nonprofit resilience and improving relationships with grantees.

    We know that grantmakers who understand and act in the best interest of grantees achieve better results. Practicing smarter grantmaking can make the difference between a pretty good performance and achieving the best possible results. But, where should you start? This learning module explores the variety of ways grants managers can take steps to improve their organization’s grantmaking practices. With a particular focus on supporting nonprofit resilience and improving relationships with grantees, this Learning Module draws on insights from GEO's Smarter Grantmaking Playbook and findings from GEO’s 2014 field study to spark participants’ thinking, questions, and reflections on their own grantmaking practice. Webinar run time: 57 minutes.

    _______________________________

    We have also provided additional resources to support your learning, which you can continue to consult as needed. 

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Communications: Listen to others and communicate effectively.
    • Financial Management: Implement financial policies and controls to ensure effective and efficient deployment of financial resources for grantmaking.
  • Building Trust with Grantees is Essential

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Having good relationships with grantees — and, at the end of the day, good grantmaking as a whole — demands that professionals working in the philanthropic world show genuine interest in other people’s knowledge and experience, and offer good questions (not just advice) in conversations. Publication date: November 30, 2017

    Having good relationships with grantees — and, at the end of the day, good grantmaking as a whole — demands that professionals working in the philanthropic world show genuine interest in other people’s knowledge and experience, and offer good questions (not just advice) in conversations. A successful grant should never be about a program officer’s goals or convictions in the first place. It should be about identifying and appreciating what each side of the table — funder and grantee — can do best together. 

    Carolyn Sosnowski

    Program Officer

    Ford Foundation

  • DEI Resources for the Philanthropic Sector

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    A curated list of resources on diversity, equity, and inclusion. Publication date: September 5, 2017

    Focus on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) in the philanthropic sector and within PEAK Grantmaking’s membership has been on the rise for quite some time now, as evidenced by projects such as the D5 Coalition and GuideStar’s efforts to create a DEI data infrastructure in philanthropy. 

    One PEAK Grantmaking member shared a list of resources collected during her organization’s research into this focus area. She and her organization have generously allowed us to share this document.

    ​Victor Gongora

    Effective Practices Project Manager

    PEAK Grantmaking

  • Ask Dr. Streamline: Wondering about the ROI of the LOI

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    The pros of LOIs. Publication date: November 28, 2017

    So why and when does the Dr. recommend use of an LOI?

    Alice Cottingham

    Consultant to Grantmaking Foundations

  • Does Your Community Foundation Need a New Database?

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    The information that community foundations need to manage keeps growing, but is your current data system keeping up? And are you taking full advantage of everything it has to offer? Original air date: November 16, 2017

    The information that community foundations need to manage keeps growing, but is your current data system keeping up? And are you taking full advantage of everything it has to offer?

    In this webinar, learn about the strengths and challenges of the top integrated grants management systems for community foundations. Drawing on The Consumer’s Guide to Integrated Systems for Community Foundations, a research report created by Idealware in collaboration with PEAK Grantmaking and the Technology Affinity Group, the presenters explain what features to look for in a new system and what makes each option stand out. They also share tips for how to decide which system meets your needs and discuss database and grants management trends.

    If you’re considering a new database within the next two or three years, watch this webinar to learn what you need to know to get started in the right direction.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Review what you can expect from an integrated grants management system.
    • Understand what’s unique about each database system.
    • Gain insight into how to select the right system for your organization.

    Karen Graham

    Executive Director

    Idealware

    Kathleen Malin

    Vice President, Technology and Operations

    Rhode Island Foundation

  • Giving in Numbers: 2017 Edition

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This report not only presents a profile of corporate philanthropy and employee engagement, but also includes a trends summary that highlights the prominent features of corporate societal investment. Publication date: November 2017

    The latest issue of this annual report provides in-depth analysis of more than 200 of the world's largest corporations. The publication found that between 2014 and 2016 the median total giving among all companies in the survey rose by 2.3%, companies are distributing fewer but larger grants, and that companies are more frequently measuring outcomes to assess the societal impact of corporate initiatives. 

  • A New Model of Collaborative Philanthropy

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    A new effort called Co-Impact is bringing together donors from around the world to better identify, align, and support opportunities for systems-level change. Publication date: November 15, 2017

    "...[W]e are launching Co-Impact, a new effort in collaborative philanthropy that brings together donors from across the globe to drive large-scale results for millions of people across the developing world.

    "We believe that collaboration is critical to solving some of the world’s most daunting social challenges, and that this requires new and better mechanisms to efficiently match outstanding social change leaders and committed philanthropists with one another and their peers. Our goal is to build a platform and community in which committed philanthropists from around the world give and learn alongside one another in deep and meaningful ways while driving extraordinary results. And we hope to build a strong case for more philanthropists to collaborate and drive results at scale."

    Initial core partners of Co-Impact include Richard Chandler, Bill & Melinda Gates, Jeff Skoll, Romesh & Kathy Wadhwani, and The Rockefeller Foundation. In addition to its role as a core partner, The Rockefeller Foundation has incubated Co-Impact and will provide staff, significant operating funds, and ongoing strategic support. The EkStep Foundation, co-founded by Rohini and Nandan Nilekani, will serve as a technical partner.

    ​​Olivia Leland

    Founder and CEO

    Co-Impact

  • Time to Revisit Reporting

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Too often, funders are missing the connections, lessons, and relationships that grant reporting could and should be making. Reporting is often our field’s first (and sometimes only) opportunity to explore the space between what we hoped for and what actually happened. Publication date: September 29, 2017

    Too often, funders are missing the connections, lessons, and relationships that grant reporting could and should be making. Reporting is often our field’s first (and sometimes only) opportunity to explore the space between what we hoped for and what actually happened.

    Jessica Bearman

    Principal

    Bearman Consulting

    JESSICA BEARMAN (Bearman Consulting) works with foundations and other mission-based organizations, focusing on organization development, facilitation, planning, and project R&D to help them become more intentional, effective, and responsive to communities. 

    Jessica has been the lead consultant to PEAK Grantmaking’s Project Streamline since its inception, helping grantmakers to understand and minimize the burden of their application and reporting practices.Prior to her work in philanthropy, Jessica spent nine years in the nonprofit sector, where she experienced plenty of mystifying requirements. She has a Masters in Organization Development from American University/National Training Laboratory. Jessica loves living on an organic farm in Idaho with her husband, two wild boys, forty philosophical chickens, and thousands of industrious bees.

    Elizabeth Myrick

    Principal

    Elizabeth Myrick + Associates

    Elizabeth Myrick is an independent consultant with nearly 20 years of experience in the nonprofit and philanthropic sector. Her work focuses on leadership and organizational strategy.

  • Star Trek and the Future of the Nonprofit Sector

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    The nonprofit of the future is defined by shared administrative, operating, and fundraising support that allows each organization significant time and resources to focus on individualized programmatic work as well as collective efforts to address systemic issues. Publication date: November 14, 2017

    The nonprofit of the future is defined by shared administrative, operating, and fundraising support that allows each organization significant time and resources to focus on individualized programmatic work as well as collective efforts to address systemic issues. 

    Vu Le

    Executive Director

    Rainier Valley Corps

  • Relationships Matter: Program Officers, Grantees, and the Keys to Success

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Relationships between funders and their grantees are crucial because the two must work well together if they are to achieve shared goals. But funder–grantee relationships can be fraught due to the inherent power imbalance between those who have resources and those who need them. How can funders effectively navigate this dynamic to build and maintain strong relationships with their grantees? From the Center for Effective Philanthropy. Publication date: November 2017

    Relationships between funders and their grantees are crucial because the two must work well together if they are to achieve shared goals. But funder–grantee relationships can be fraught due to the inherent power imbalance between those who have resources and those who need them. How can funders effectively navigate this dynamic to build and maintain strong relationships with their grantees?

    Relationships Matter: Program Officers, Grantees, and the Keys to Success sheds light on what constitutes a strong funder–grantee relationship, what nonprofits say it takes for funders to foster such relationships, and the crucial role that program officers play in the equation.

    The report finds that in the eyes of nonprofits, the most powerful ways that funders can strengthen their relationships with grantees are to: 1) focus on understanding grantee organizations and the context in which they work; and 2) be transparent with grantees. Less powerful, but still important to forming strong relationships, are the experiences grantees have during the selection process and how open they find funders to be to their ideas about the foundation’s strategy.

    Findings of the study are based on the Center for Effective Philanthropy’s analysis of the perspectives of nearly 20,000 grantees of 86 foundations, as well as insights gleaned from interviews with 11 program officers whose grantees provided high ratings about their funder experience through CEP’s Grantee Perception Report (GPR).