Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By

773 Results

  • Learning Advisor

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Own your own development and take control of your career!

    Identify and Address Skills Gaps. Optimize Your Performance.

    Exclusive benefit for Organization Members

    Based on the Grants Management Professional Competency Model, the PEAK Grantmaking Learning Advisor enables you to create an actionable plan that identifies skills gaps and provides recommendations on how to close them. Skills and knowledge are assessed on 5 levels of skill: Learning, Basic, Applied, Skilled and Expert. Take the assessment to see where you are, follow the learning plan to get to the next level.

    How does it work?

    1. Complete a self-assessment based on the 14 areas of the Grants Management Professional Competency Model.
    2. Get a personalized plan for closing skills gaps with recommendations on resources, training, and activities to help close identified gaps. 
    3. Use your plan to track your progress toward your goals. 

    What else can you do with Learning Advisor? 

    • Demonstrate commitment to your professional development by sharing your plan with your supervisor. 
    • Start a conversation with your manager about advancement, capacity, and growth using the plan as a roadmap.   
  • Part 1: Racially Equitable Grantmaking, No Longer a Choice

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    More and more nonprofit professionals are paying attention to the national dialogue and waking up to the fact that racial equity can no longer be a choice in their work. Publication date: March 13, 2018

    More and more nonprofit professionals are paying attention to the national dialogue and waking up to the fact that racial equity can no longer be a choice in their work. Some of those are in the philanthropic sector and have begun addressing it in their grantmaking. Different organizations are in different places along the continuum when it comes to the integration of a racial equity lens, but it is encouraging that strides are increasingly being made to include racial equity in daily operations.

    Alyssa Curran

    Program Officer

    Missouri Foundation for Health

  • What is Project Streamline and Where’d It Come From?

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Simply put, the cumulative impact of grantmakers’ distinct and often laborious application and reporting requirements undermines nonprofit effectiveness, causing grantseekers to devote too much time to seeking funding (often without payoff) and reporting on grants (often without benefit) to the detriment of their mission-based work. Publication date: March 7, 2018

    Simply put, the cumulative impact of grantmakers’ distinct and often laborious application and reporting requirements undermines nonprofit effectiveness, causing grantseekers to devote too much time to seeking funding (often without payoff) and reporting on grants (often without benefit) to the detriment of their mission-based work.

    Jessica Bearman

    Principal

    Bearman Consulting

    JESSICA BEARMAN (Bearman Consulting) works with foundations and other mission-based organizations, focusing on organization development, facilitation, planning, and project R&D to help them become more intentional, effective, and responsive to communities. 

    Jessica has been the lead consultant to PEAK Grantmaking’s Project Streamline since its inception, helping grantmakers to understand and minimize the burden of their application and reporting practices.Prior to her work in philanthropy, Jessica spent nine years in the nonprofit sector, where she experienced plenty of mystifying requirements. She has a Masters in Organization Development from American University/National Training Laboratory. Jessica loves living on an organic farm in Idaho with her husband, two wild boys, forty philosophical chickens, and thousands of industrious bees.

  • A Transformational Approach to Grantmaking

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Elevate Energy seized this unique opportunity to grow from an organization that focuses on program implementation to an organization that uses its on-the-ground, practical experience to help influence and inform energy policy in partnership with other leaders. Publication date: December 19, 2017

    Elevate Energy – a Chicago-based community development agency that helps people do more with less energy – participated in a funding opportunity that enabled them to think transformationally about how to achieve their mission. By providing multi-year, unrestricted grant support, the Citi Foundation’s Community Progress Makers Fund helped the organization develop the evidence and business case to dramatically increase clean energy investments in low-income communities. The Fund is an innovative approach to grantmaking that pushes organizations to transform the world by first transforming themselves. Elevate Energy seized this unique opportunity to grow from an organization that focuses on program implementation to an organization that uses its on-the-ground, practical experience to help influence and inform energy policy in partnership with other leaders. 

    In other words, the Community Progress Makers Fund helped them move from being a “doer” to being an “influencer.” Many of their nonprofit peers could likewise benefit from this kind of funding model and they urge other foundations to consider similar approaches.

    ​Anne Evens

    Chief Executive Officer

    Elevate Energy

  • Journalism and Media Grantmaking: Five Things You Need to Know and Five Ways to Get Started

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This booklet is a starter guide for foundations interested in exploring how to make impactful journalism and community-information grants. Publication date: March 2018

    This booklet is a starter guide for foundations interested in exploring how to make impactful journalism and community-information grants.

  • Creating a Data Culture

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    How nonprofit organizations can do a better job with their data. Publication date: March 2, 2018

    While 75 percent of nonprofits collect data, only 6 percent feel they are using it effectively.... Although many organizations don’t feel like their organizations are making good use of their data, creating a data culture is critical to their success. Actively and consistently using data to inform decisions allows nonprofits to track whether their programs are resulting in the outcomes they intend.

    Kathleen Kelly Janus

    Lecturer

    Stanford Program on Social Entrepreneurship

  • Too Many Foundation Boards Are Failing at Diversity

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Forty percent of foundation boards for which BoardSource gathered data reported they are all white. Excluding family foundations, 35 percent of the boards have no members who are people of color. Publication date: March 5, 2018

    Forty percent of foundation boards for which BoardSource gathered data reported they are all white. Excluding family foundations, 35 percent of the boards have no members who are people of color.

    People who bring a range of backgrounds — including race but also extending to many other elements including disability, socio-economic history, and life experience — are better positioned to help a foundation choose goals and chart the strategies to achieve them.

    So it’s about effectiveness. If you doubt that, see, for example, this short summary of a number of research studies linking diversity to performance.

    Phil Buchanan

    President

    Center for Effective Philanthropy

  • Essential Responsibilities of Foundation Governance

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Governance matters across sectors, of course. But within the nonprofit sector, foundation governance is especially crucial. Publication date: March 1, 2018

    Governance matters across sectors, of course. But within the nonprofit sector, foundation governance is especially crucial.

    Every board should annually and in some formal way assess its CEO against mutually agreed-upon goals. There’s no excuse for not doing so. Foundation CEOs whose boards haven’t initiated a conversation about the process should take the initiative to do so themselves — proposing a process that includes a range of relevant qualitative and quantitative data and allows for direct and unfiltered feedback from staff and other key constituents to the board.

    Phil Buchanan

    President

    Center for Effective Philanthropy

  • Foundation Board Leadership: A Closer Look at Foundation Board Responses to Leading with Intent 2017

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    In an effort to better understand the particular dynamics of foundation boards, BoardSource took a closer look at the subset of responses from the 141 foundation leaders who completed the 2017 Leading with Intent survey. While the sample of foundation responses is relatively small and a convenience versus representative or randomized sample, we believe the report provides insight that may be applicable to the foundation community more broadly. Publication date: February 2018

    In an effort to better understand the particular dynamics of foundation boards, BoardSource took a closer look at the subset of responses from the 141 foundation leaders who completed the 2017 Leading with Intent survey. While the sample of foundation responses is relatively small and a convenience versus representative or randomized sample, we believe the report provides insight that may be applicable to the foundation community more broadly.

    Key findings:

    • When it comes to the board’s perceived impact on foundation performance, there are three board characteristics that may matter most: 1) providing guidance and support to the chief executive, 2) the board’s understanding of its roles and responsibilities, and 3) the extent to which the board is adaptable in the face of changes in the environment.
    • Foundation boards lack racial and ethnic diversity in profound ways — and current recruitment practices demonstrate that is unlikely to change.
    • Foundation boards that assess their own performance regularly report stronger board performance, but too few foundation boards have adopted this recommended practice.
  • 5 Manifestations of Delusional Altruism

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Funders may think they’re doing things right when they are, in fact, employing policies or practices that unintentionally cause unpleasant consequences for themselves and those they serve—and sometimes even cause more harm than good. This is...delusional altruism. Although delusional altruism is rarely intentional, it is pervasive, and its manifestations among funders can be difficult to recognize. Publication date: February 28, 2018

    Funders may think they’re doing things right when they are, in fact, employing policies or practices that unintentionally cause unpleasant consequences for themselves and those they serve—and sometimes even cause more harm than good. This is...delusional altruism.

    Although delusional altruism is rarely intentional, it is pervasive, and its manifestations among funders can be difficult to recognize. 

    Kris Putnam-Walkerly

    President

    Putnam Consulting Group