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780 Results

  • Northern California Regional Chapter: A Day in the Life of a Grants Manager

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    We will hear from three PEAK Grantmaking members about their day-to-day life as grants managers, including their place in their organization’s structure, the size of their team, their interactions with staff and board members, some of their key responsibilities, and their responsibilities that fall outside the scope of grants management. We’ll also learn what brought them to the field and what most excites them about their work. Audience participation and peer learning included!   

    Participants will learn about: 

    The ways in which the grants management role is structured in different organizations

    The range of responsibilities and tasks that can fall under a grants management role

    What keeps their colleagues engaged in their work 2019 educational programming and networking opportunities for our chapter

    Jessica Hickok

    Grants Manager

    Pisces Foundation

    Jessica is grants manager at the Pisces Foundation, overseeing the Foundation’s grantmaking policies, procedures, and systems.

    Previously, Jessica served as The James Irvine Foundation’s grants manager, and, prior to that, she was with the Koret Foundation as a program assistant, program associate, and grants manager. Jessica also has been a Princeton-in-Africa Fellow at the Mpala Wildlife Foundation in Kenya.

    Jessica is an active member of PEAK Grantmaking’s Northern California chapter, most recently serving as membership chair; she also serves as finance officer for the Flaming Lotus Girls, a collaborative, female-driven metal and fire arts group. Jessica is on the boards of The Brooklyn Quarterly, a nonprofit literary endeavor, and Humanities West, a multidisciplinary history and arts organization.

    Jessica graduated from Princeton University with a B.A. in comparative literature.

    Rosa King

    Program Officer

    The Carl Gellert and Celia Berta Gellert Foundation

    Cathy Manovi

    Grants Officer

    Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

    Colin Richardson

    Director of Grants Administration

    The San Francisco Foundation

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Staff and Volunteer Development: Build the capacity of staff and volunteers to be successful in their grantmaking role.

  • Southeast Regional Chapter: Chapter Meeting and Leveraging Communication, Technology Trends, and Grants Management

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Join your fellow Southeast Chapter members for a session filled with conversations, insights, updates and more! We’ll share what’s in store for the upcoming year, do some speed-networking, and welcome Tierney Smith and Nikki Barrett from Grantbook, who will discuss the intersections between social media communications, emerging trends in technology, and grants management. Any burning technology questions you’d like addressed?

    Nikki Barret

    Managing Director

    Grantbook

    Tierney Smith

    Philanthropy Advisor

    Grantbook

    Tierney specializes in helping foundations to advance their mission through better use of technology. As a philanthropy solution advisor at Grantbook, she helps clients craft their digital strategy, select right-sized technology tools and implement new systems. She is also leads Grantbook's change management coaching practice. Tierney has a degree in Software Engineering from the University of Waterloo.

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Communications: Listen to others and communicate effectively.

  • Bust the “Overhead” Myth; Pay True Indirect Costs

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    The True Cost Project was a collaboration by five foundations to explore the sector-wide challenge of insufficient indirect cost recovery among grantees and to identify solutions for paying grantees’ “true costs.” The project team conducted original research, engaged with approximately 100 grantees, and consulted a range of financial experts. Representatives from the three participating foundations will discuss findings from their work and the strategic changes they are implementing at their institutions.

    Participants will learn about:

    Ideas for approaches to grantmaking that cover grantees’ true costs

    The depth and breadth of the sector’s indirect cost recovery problem

    Why grantees and funders have misunderstandings about costs

    Approaches to pay actual indirect costs accurately and responsibly

    James Gallagher

    Senior Grants Manager, Future of Work

    Ford Foundation

    Jim Gallagher is the senior grants manager for U.S. Programs at the Ford Foundation and has worked across several grant and program-related investment portfolios to reduce poverty and expand economic opportunity for low-income and marginalized people in the US and developing countries.

    Prior to joining Ford, Jim served as grants manager for the John A. Hartford Foundation, the largest US private philanthropy dedicated to aging and health, and before that as a development manager for an international nonprofit organization focused on research, education, and advocacy concerned with aging populations.

    Jim holds a master’s degree in public administration from New York University’s Wagner School of Public Service and a bachelor’s degree in finance from Fordham University.

    ​Jessica Halverson

    Grants Officer, Environment

    The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

    Jessica Halverson is a grants officer in Environment at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. She works across the grantmaking portfolio on the program’s strategies in climate change, clean energy, and conservation. She also works on the foundation’s efforts to build more financially resilient nonprofit organizations.

    Previously, Jessica was a senior manager at Ceres, a nonprofit organization advocating for sustainability leadership in the private sector. She started her career in nonprofit consulting and has worked across a range of issues including youth, family homelessness, and reproductive health. From 2007 to 2012 she was treasurer of the board of directors for Our Bodies Ourselves, a global women’s health organization.

    Jessica graduated with a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Grinnell College and holds an MBA with concentrations in nonprofit management and strategy and innovation from Boston University’s Graduate School of Management.

    Arum Lansel

    Programs Operations Manager for Organizational Effectiveness

    David and Lucile Packard Foundation

    Arum Lee Lansel has over 12 years of experience working in the social sector, with a focus on international development. Current she serves as the Program Operations Manager for Organizational Effectiveness (OE) at the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. In this role, she manages monitoring, evaluation, and learning for OE and serves as a program officer for capacity building grants in Sub-Saharan Africa. Prior to joining the Foundation, she was a Senior Project Officer for Tetra Tech DPK, a consulting firm that helps developing and transitioning countries establish the rule of law and develop sustainable government and justice systems. She managed highly complex development projects in Democratic Republic of Congo, Jordan, the West Bank, and Iraq. She also previously worked for International Justice Mission (IJM), a non-profit organization working to protect the poor from violence in the developing world.

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Lifecycle of a Grant Competencies

    • Award and Monitoring: Establish mutual expectations between the grantmaker and grantee to support success.

  • Complex Hierarchical Taxonomies Made Simple: A Vancouver Foundation Case Study

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    The Vancouver Foundation recently incorporated an updated taxonomy into its workflow to bring a consistent context to its grantmaking. By doing so, Canada’s largest community foundation realized a more efficient way to match the intentions of the projects under consideration with the intentions of the funds at its discretion. Review how the Vancouver Foundation implemented its own variation of the Philanthropy Classification System for increased efficiency and effectiveness.

    Participants will learn about:

    How foundation staff chose, adapted, and applied the taxonomy to their grantmaking processes

    How foundation staff implemented their requirements into in the grants management system

    Key lessons to consider when implementing a similar initiative

    David Doig

    Director, Grants and Community Initiatives

    Vancouver Foundation

    ​Malcolm Klotz

    Founder & CTO

    Re-Solved

    Founder and Chief Technology Officer of Business Solutions, Re-Solved. An entrepreneurial minded business analyst who thrives on problem solving big or small. A driven, strategic thinker who understands and implements the necessary harmony between technology and operations.  Malcolm has spent the past 12 years delivering software and implementation services primarily in the philanthropic sector. He takes pride in providing innovative and automated business solutions that "Re-Solve" client's existing and outdated processes.

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Technology Management: Apply technology solutions to grantmaking to support grantmaker applicant, and grantee success.

  • Getting to Impact: A Measurement Blueprint

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Developing and delivering successful giving programs for those you support is no easy task. Today’s issues run deeper and loom larger than what is seen on the surface. In many cases, today’s problems can only be addressed through collaboration and the work of many. Giving programs that effect change require both financial resources and human capital. To attain and demonstrate the deepest impact with limited resources, implement a social impact framework. Whether you’re creating a new program or looking to improve on past successes, a social impact framework will help your organization improve its effectiveness by ensuring a direct link between your organization’s mission, giving programs, and grantee outcomes. See how a social impact framework can help your organization become more results-focused and better measure investments of time, talent, and treasure, to increase impact.

    Participants will learn about:

    Measurement terminology

    Social Impact logic models (AKA results frameworks)

    Measuring all investments—grants, volunteer time, and in-kind donations

    Michelle DiSabato

    President

    Community Impact Consultants, Inc.

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Communications: Listen to others and communicate effectively.
    • Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Promote diversity, equity, and inclusion in grantmaking practices.
    • Ethics, Integrity, and Accountability: Act with integrity and accountability.
      Financial Management: Implement financial policies and controls to ensure effective and efficient deployment of financial resources for grantmaking.
      Knowledge Management: Capture and apply knowledge to promote learning and improvement.
      Process and Change Management: Plan and monitor processes efficiently and effectively and manage change as needed to contribute to grantmaker's strategic goals and grantee's success.
      Staff and Volunteer Development: Build the capacity of staff and volunteers to be successful in their grantmaking role.
      Strategic Management: Promote organizational mission and goals and inspire colleagues to achieve them.
      Technology Management: Apply technology solutions to grantmaking to support grantmaker applicant, and grantee success.

    Lifecycle of a Grant Competencies

    • Planning and Pre-Grant: Apply the grantmaker values, mission, and goals to ensure alignment of application process and guidelines.
      Planning and Pre-Grant: Design and implement the review process to support an informed grant decision.
    • Award and Monitoring: Establish mutual expectations between the grantmaker and grantee to support success.
      Award and Monitoring: Monitor grantee activity to support grantee success and determine compliance with grant agreement.
      Post-Grant: Review grantmaking to determine success in meeting goals and objectives.

  • Incorporating Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion into Grantmaking: Can Technology Help?

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    What does diversity, equity, and inclusion mean in the world of grantmaking? How can technology empower grantmakers to establish equitable practices across their programs? Identify how your foundation can get started.

    Participants will learn about:

    Diversity, equity, and inclusion strategy

    Executive buy-in

    Meaningful demographic segmentation

    Julia Cannon

    Product Manager, foundationConnect

    Salesforce.org

    Karina Rivera

    Education Special Projects, and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

    Heising-Simons Foundation

    Tashie Sloley

    Senior Grants Manager

    Borealis Philanthropy

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Promote diversity, equity, and inclusion in grantmaking practices.
    • Technology Management: Apply technology solutions to grantmaking to support grantmaker applicant, and grantee success.

  • The Power Equation: Equalizing Power for Win/Win Solutions

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Many of us feel our power is limited to our role on the organization chart or generation of the family tree. If we feel that our wants and needs are not as important as or are more important than those around us, we may see others as above or below us. This perspective could prompt us to say “yes” to things we really don’t want to do, forego asking for what we really want, or include/exclude others as we work towards solutions. A new frame of reference can help us view everyone’s wants and needs as equal, enabling us to see different solutions. With a new frame of reference, we can stop looking to others to fulfill our wants, take responsibility for our needs, and create solutions that empower everyone involved. Discover what makes us feel powerless and how to balance the power equation.

    Participants will learn about:

    Limiting beliefs that keep us and others feeling powerless

    A shared purpose for any situation

    Understanding and honoring the desires of both grantees and grantmakers

    New frames of reference for finding win/win solutions with others

    Genise Singleton

    Program Manager

    The Kresge Foundation

    Genise T. Singleton is program operations manager for The Kresge Foundation, overseeing day-to-day operations of the grants and program-related investments portfolio. She joined Kresge’s staff in 1995.

    She assists in the overall development and streamlining of the foundation’s grant processes and procedures, ensuring the proper disposition of grants and program-related investments and grantee compliance. She also reviews Kresge’s grants database.

    Genise has a deep interest in the ways data can be used to advance the work of the philanthropic sector, and is a member of several philanthropic affinity groups.

    A Detroit native, she earned a bachelor of arts in English from Marygrove College and has served on Marygrove’s alumni board as well as the boards of several other nonprofits.

    ​Wendy Watson-Hallowell

    Belief Coach

    BeliefWorks

    Wendy is passionate about enabling individuals, organizations and communities to value themselves and each other in the ongoing process of change. She has guided hundreds of individuals and over 750+ public and private sector organizations to achieve tangible increases in impact and performance. Wendy’s skills have been honed in leadership and mentoring roles at MTV Networks, The Rensselaerville Institute, and the nonprofit she runs in her town. In 2015 she became The Belief Coach and offers Belief Coaching as a way to address the root cause of what limits the results we can achieve both personally and professionally. This is an 'upstream' solution to change. Instead of changing limiting behavior, she focuses on changing the limiting beliefs that drive that behavior. In all cases, her clients and partners speak to the specific increases in achievement that her consulting, coaching and partnership roles make possible.

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Promote diversity, equity, and inclusion in grantmaking practices.
    • Process and Change Management: Plan and monitor processes efficiently and effectively and manage change as needed to contribute to grantmaker's strategic goals and grantee's success.

  • Communicating and Facilitating the End of Grant Funding

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    There are many guidelines and best practices for starting grant programs but few for closing them out. Yet, a poor closeout process can negatively affect an organization’s relationships and reputation, hurting its future work in the field. Effectively ending a grants program requires consistent and transparent communication with grantees and stakeholders, a thoughtful process for wrapping up reporting and payments, and a steady focus on achieving a positive impact until the end. ClearWay Minnesota, a statewide nonprofit dedicated to reducing tobacco’s harm, was created with an intentional 25-year lifespan. In preparation for ClearWay Minnesota’s sunset, staff developed principles for ending grants and exiting the field. This session will provide guidance for communicating clearly as you close out funding, setting a positive but realistic tone with grantees, helping organizations you fund make plans for the future, and recognizing significant accomplishments your funding helped achieve.

    Participants will learn about:

    Communicating early, often, and positively about the end of grant funding

    Varying definitions of “sustainability” and activities that realistically can continue after funding ends

    Grant closeout milestones, e.g. determining ownership of grant deliverables and celebrating accomplishments

    Alexis Bylander

    Senior Public Affairs Manager

    ClearWay Minnesota

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Communications: Listen to others and communicate effectively.
    • Process and Change Management: Plan and monitor processes efficiently and effectively and manage change as needed to contribute to grantmaker's strategic goals and grantee's success.
    • Strategic Management: Promote organizational mission and goals and inspire colleagues to achieve them.

    Lifecycle of a Grant Competencies

    • Post-Grant: Review grantmaking to determine success in meeting goals and objectives.

  • Data’s Role in Driving Performance, Internally and Externally

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Data can drive individual, department, and grantee performance. For example, reviewing data over the lifecycle of a grant can highlight the need for training on a particular process or suggest an adjustment in grants management software. Hear how data has driven departmental, operational, and individual performance as MacArthur Foundation transitioned to a new grants management system and centralized grants management department.

    Participants will learn about:

    Management’s perspective on data use

    Bottlenecks in workflow

    Using data to drive performance

    Steven Casey

    Associate Director, Grants Management

    MacArthur Foundation

    Steve is the associate director in grants management for the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation in Chicago, Illinois. He is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the grants management team and advises staff on grants management, structure of grants, and regulatory compliance requirements, and helps to ensure that the right systems, processes, and practices are in place to accomplish the goals and objectives of the Foundation.

    Steve earned his Bachelor of Administration in Finance from the University of the District of Columbia and his M.B.A. in Finance from Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

    The Caseys are raising their two son’s (Joel & Michael) in the Englewood community of Chicago. A homeowner and property owner in his neighborhood, Steve also is affiliated with numerous community related activities and currently is on the Board of Neighborhood Housing Services of Chicago. Named a German Marshall Fund Fellow in 2004.

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Knowledge Management: Capture and apply knowledge to promote learning and improvement.
    • Process and Change Management: Plan and monitor processes efficiently and effectively and manage change as needed to contribute to grantmaker's strategic goals and grantee's success.
    • Technology Management: Apply technology solutions to grantmaking to support grantmaker applicant, and grantee success.

  • From Transactional Grantmaking to Impactful Investing: An Outcomes Framework

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    At a time when grantmakers seek to demonstrate the outcomes from their work, how can you shift from transactional grantmaking to impactful investing? For 15 years, the Huey and Angelina Wilson Foundation contributed more than $27 million to Louisiana communities. Then, the Foundation decided to take a more strategic approach to giving. Located in the state with the highest incarceration rate in the world, the foundation launched a three-year, $3 million Prison Re-entry initiative to improve outcomes for more than 17,000 individuals released each year from Louisiana’s prisons and jails. The initiative created a continuum of care for released individuals, reducing recidivism and increasing savings associated with successful reintegration. Nearly complete, the initiative has changed relationships with grantees and improved the community. This session will examine a case study on creating and implementing the Prison Re-entry initiative.

    Participants will learn about:

    Self-evaluation for readiness to engage in transactional grantmaking

    Creating a culture of learning and improvement, both internally and with grantees

    Demonstrating achievement of grant and portfolio objectives

    Tristi Charpentier

    Vice President, Strategic Initiatives

    Huey and Angelina Wilson Foundation

    Tristi Charpentier is VP Strategic Initiatives for Huey and Angelina Wilson Foundation. She is the key contact for the Prison Reentry Initiative and supports grantees, develops strategic collaborations, coordinates gatherings and communications, assesses performance, and facilitates improvements. Previously, she developed and managed the regional infrastructure of anti-poverty non-profit Single Stop’s multi-million-dollar annual grant plan in the Gulf Coast. She began her career at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana managing the corporate sponsorship program and the BCBSLA Foundation’s impact grant, Angel Award and Smart Bodies programs. 

    Tristi holds bachelor's and master's degrees in mass communication from LSU and has received certificates in Corporate Citizenship Leadership and Corporate Community Involvement from the Boston College Center for Corporate Citizenship. She has been a Baton Rouge Forty Under 40 and a Hull Fellow of the Southeastern Council of Foundations.

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Process and Change Management: Plan and monitor processes efficiently and effectively and manage change as needed to contribute to grantmaker's strategic goals and grantee's success.