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695 Results

  • Why We Accept Proposals Written for Other Funders

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    "We find that the proposals they have written for other funders work just fine for us. They give us the info we need to get started, and then we can google their 990s, talk to colleagues in the field, and, most importantly, meet with them and observe their programs." Publication date: January 8, 2018

    "We find that the proposals they have written for other funders work just fine for us. They give us the info we need to get started, and then we can google their 990s, talk to colleagues in the field, and, most importantly, meet with them and observe their programs."

    ​​Lisa Pilar Cowan

    Vice President of Programs

    Robert Sterling Clark Foundation

  • 2016 Salary & Jobs Survey Report

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Grants management professionals are being paid more to do a greater volume of higher level work than ever before, according to the PEAK Grantmaking 2016 Salary and Jobs Survey Report.

    The report is intended to provide PEAK Grantmaking members, their supervisors, and grantmaking organizations with current and accurate data regarding salaries, jobs, and practices within the grants management profession. This report remains the only source of salary information with this level of detail in the field. All salary data reported in this survey are effective as of March 31, 2016.


  • How Grantmakers Unwittingly Make Life Harder for Nonprofits

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    "Too often, a philanthropist’s or foundation’s work and effectiveness, while generous in spirit, is confounded by the requirements and processes that the funder adopts — requirements and processes that make their nonprofit partners tear out their hair. It’s not the philanthropist’s intention to make life harder; it simply happens because no one is paying attention. Here are six of the most common examples." Publication date: August 1, 2017

    "Too often, a philanthropist’s or foundation’s work and effectiveness, while generous in spirit, is confounded by the requirements and processes that the funder adopts — requirements and processes that make their nonprofit partners tear out their hair. It’s not the philanthropist’s intention to make life harder; it simply happens because no one is paying attention. Here are six of the most common examples."

    Kris Putnam-Walkerly

    President

    Putnam Consulting Group

  • Shouting into the Mouth of a Cave

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    By asking provocative questions to a wide variety of people, you’ll get a broader range of answers, experiences and perspectives. Publication date: November 14, 2017

    By asking provocative questions to a wide variety of people, you’ll get a broader range of answers, experiences and perspectives. 

    Kris Putnam-Walkerly

    President

    Putnam Consulting Group

  • Foundations Don’t Know What They’re Risking

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Critical gaps exist in philanthropy’s definitions of and approach to risk management. This article describes the scope of the problem and a framework for philanthropists to adopt risk-management practices that better equip the sector to address the challenges of our time. Publication date: July 24, 2017

    Critical gaps exist in philanthropy’s definitions of and approach to risk management. This article describes the scope of the problem and a framework for philanthropists to adopt risk-management practices that better equip the sector to address the challenges of our time.

    Maya Winkelstein

    Executive Director

    Open Road Alliance

    Maya Winkelstein is executive director of Open Road Alliance where she is responsible for the organization’s investment strategy and management of both Open Road Alliance and Open Road Ventures.

    Prior to her role as executive director, she worked with Open Road as an associate director with the consulting firm williamsworks. Former clients also include Eastern Congo Initiative, Nike Foundation, PATH, and TOMS Shoes.

    She is a frequent speaker at forums and her work has appeared in a number of publications including SSIR and The Foundation Review. Maya has been featured in Chronicle of Philanthropy’s ‘On the Rise’ series and Huffington Post’s ‘Women in Business.’ She is a Board Member of Global Press Institute and a member of the Leadership Advisory Council for GrantAdvisors.org.

    Maya holds a BA from the University of Michigan; MSc from the London School of Economics; and Certificate in Corporate Finance from Georgetown University. She lives in NY with her husband and two young sons.

    Shelley Whelpton

    Managing Director

    Arabella Advisors

  • Risk in Philanthropy: A Framework for Evaluation

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    To help both grantmakers and NGOs better identify, assess, mitigate, and plan for risk in their portfolios, Open Road Alliance offers the following framework for evaluating risk. This brief framework is designed to provide grantmakers and NGOs with tools to conceptualize and describe risk and its implications within the scope of their philanthropic work. Publication date: June 2015

    To help both grantmakers and NGOs better identify, assess, mitigate, and plan for risk in their portfolios, Open Road Alliance offers the following framework for evaluating risk. This brief framework is designed to provide grantmakers and NGOs with tools to conceptualize and describe risk and its implications within the scope of their philanthropic work.

  • The Problem with Donor-Advised Funds—and a Solution

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Commercial national charities in the United States are warehousing billions of dollars that should be going to mission-driven nonprofits. Publication date: December 20, 2017

    Commercial national charities in the United States are warehousing billions of dollars that should be going to mission-driven nonprofits. 

    Mark Hurtubise

    Former President and CEO

    Inland Northwest Community Foundation 

  • Staying Connected: How Five Foundations Understand Those They Seek to Help

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    To learn more about how foundations cultivate an understanding of those they and their grantees are ultimately seeking to serve, the Center for Effective Philanthropy interviewed CEOs and program staff from five foundations that have participated in CEP’s Grantee Perception Report® (GPR). These five foundations ranked among the top 15 percent of the 86 foundations that commissioned a GPR between 2016 and 2017, according to how the grantees they fund rated the foundations on the following questions: • How well does the foundation understand your intended beneficiaries’ needs? • To what extent do the foundation’s funding priorities reflect a deep understanding of your intended beneficiaries’ needs? This report features profiles illustrating how each foundation develops its understanding of beneficiary needs and incorporates that understanding into its work. Publication date: December 2017

    To learn more about how foundations cultivate an understanding of those they and their grantees are ultimately seeking to serve, the Center for Effective Philanthropy interviewed CEOs and program staff from five foundations that have participated in CEP’s Grantee Perception Report® (GPR). These five foundations ranked among the top 15 percent of the 86 foundations that commissioned a GPR between 2016 and 2017, according to how the grantees they fund rated the foundations on the following questions:

    • How well does the foundation understand your intended beneficiaries’ needs?
    • To what extent do the foundation’s funding priorities reflect a deep understanding of your intended beneficiaries’ needs?

    This report features profiles illustrating how each foundation develops its understanding of beneficiary needs and incorporates that understanding into its work. 

    Jennifer Glickman

    Manager, Research

    Center for Effective Philanthropy (CEP)

    Matthew Leiwant

    Assistant Manager, Research

    Center for Effective Philanthropy (CEP)

    Ellie Buteau

    Vice President, Research

    Center for Effective Philanthropy (CEP)

  • Why Demographic Data Matters

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Grantmakers occupy a powerful space between power and privilege in the social change sector. As such, they have a unique opportunity—and responsibility—to work proactively toward equity and inclusivity. Increasingly, grantmaking institutions are challenging themselves to not just talk the talk, but walk the walk, when it comes to equity. Publication date: December 13, 2017

    PEAK Grantmaking believes that having a common approach to demographic data will allow that data to be transformed into information and knowledge, strengthening the field.  More consistency in grantmaker practice is also critical to grantees who are the source of the data.  

    ​Michelle Greanias

    Executive Director

    PEAK Grantmaking

    Michelle Greanias, executive director of PEAK Grantmaking, is a passionate advocate for efficient and effective grantmaking and is deeply committed to elevating the value of grantmaking practices in philanthropy. Since 2008, Michelle has led the explosive growth of PEAK Grantmaking, making it one of the largest networks in the field.

    Michelle has spent most of her career in corporate philanthropy, leading grants management teams to implement efficient, effective grantmaking practices. She has also overseen program-related investments; engaged in projects to facilitate socially responsible investments in housing and community development; and managed employee giving programs.

    Michelle speaks and writes regularly on effective grants management practices and has consulted with government and private sector grants programs to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of their grantmaking operations.

    Michelle serves on the GuideStar Advisory Council and on the National Panel for GrantAdvisor. She holds bachelor’s degrees in international relations and French/West European studies and a master’s in business administration from The American University.

  • We Need a New Definition of Effectiveness

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    "We’ve recognized problems with most ways effectiveness is defined for nonprofits.... [T]he ability to assess and achieve results does not mean that an organization is inherently effective – especially if program models and theories of change are rooted in false narratives about the causes of inequity, or if the results are not those most desired by the people and communities being served." Publication date: December 4, 2017

    "We’ve recognized problems with most ways effectiveness is defined for nonprofits.... [T]he ability to assess and achieve results does not mean that an organization is inherently effective – especially if program models and theories of change are rooted in false narratives about the causes of inequity, or if the results are not those most desired by the people and communities being served.

    ...

    "Work to define effectiveness has typically come from white organizations – prominent consulting firms, think tanks, universities, philanthropy and management support organizations. These institutions have advanced ideas about effectiveness that have unwittingly perpetuated or even exacerbated inequity in the nonprofit sector."

    Kathleen P. Enright

    President and CEO

    Grantmakers for Effective Organizations (GEO)