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  • Facilitating Difficult Conversations in the Workplace

    Contains 4 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Interested in taking your communication or meeting facilitation skills up a notch? This is the session for you. Participants will learn communication tools that diffuse tension, mitigate conflict, maximize understanding between colleagues, and keep the conversation moving forward. The skills in this workshop will prevent people from reaching premature solutions that tend to be less effective and less than ideal.

    Participants will learn about:

    How to navigate a conversation that is “position based” into one that is “interest based”

    Diffusing tension in a meeting that’s getting overheated

    Navigating a conversation involving co-workers struggling to work well together

    How to dissolve power dynamics in a room

    Using conversation facilitation skills to resolve conflict

    Erin Speltz

    Mediator

    Conflict Resolution Center

    Erin is a Qualified Neutral under Rule 114 in the state of Minnesota where she volunteers as a trained mediator with the Conflict Resolution Center. In this role she helps parties reach mediated agreements by facilitating critical communications between conflicted parties. She likewise promotes constructive dialogue for the city of Minneapolis’ 2040 Rule that determines housing ordinances each decade.

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Communications: Listen to others and communicate effectively.
    • Staff and Volunteer Development: Build the capacity of staff and volunteers to be successful in their grantmaking role.
    • Strategic Management: Promote organizational mission and goals and inspire colleagues to achieve them.

  • Foundation Support for Nonprofit Advocacy

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Not sure how to make the case for funding advocacy? Uncertain whether you can fund grantees that lobby? Wondering whether your public or private foundation can speak out on an issue? Discover the answers to these questions and more—for public and private foundations.

    Participants will learn about:

    Reasons for public and private foundations to support advocacy

    Activities that constitute advocacy and public policy work

    Various advocacy roles for foundations

    Definitions of lobbying

    Activities that are exceptions to the definitions of lobbying

    Rules for private and public foundation grants to nonprofits that lobby

    Grant agreement language that permits support for policy work

    Permissible private and public foundation support for election-related activities

    Alison Friedman Phillips

    Manager of Programs

    The Women's Foundation of Colorado

    Born in Colorado, Alison loves the outdoors and western ideals. In her current role, she manages programs at The Women’s Foundation of Colorado. This gives her the privilege of making grants to nonprofits, diving deep into research, and advocating at the state capitol on behalf of Colorado’s women and their families. Before that she lived in Washington, D.C., and spent time as an intern in the education policy program at New America and in the office of the Honorable Michael Bennet. And even before that she lived and worked in the beautiful Roaring Fork Valley serving as a development officer at Aspen Community Foundation. Alison earned a Master of Public Policy from The George Washington University and a Bachelors of Arts in political science with minors in business administration and nonprofit administration from the University of Oregon. She loves pop culture, politics, and philanthropy and lives in the Baker neighborhood with her partner and their corgi, Albus Dumbledog.

    Sara Guillaume

    Senior Director of Grantmaking Operations

    Colorado Health Foundation

    Sara is passionate about building stronger communities and helping people thrive. She has been in the grantmaking field for more than 15 years. Prior to joining the Colorado Health Foundation in 2008, Sara administered federal and local grant funds, and provided consulting services to build the capacity of nonprofit organizations.

    Sara is responsible for leading the operations related to the Foundation’s complete grantmaking process, from application to final report. She oversees a team that is focused on compliance, the customer experience, process design, and grant data reporting. She works collaboratively across the organization to design programs and systems that align the Foundation’s operations with its strategy. 

    As a lifelong Coloradan, Sara has a BA in Psychology from the University of Colorado and a Master of Nonprofit Management from Denver's Regis University. She is a Stanford University Certified Project Manager, and has a black belt in Process Improvement.

    Carlos Martinez

    Executive Director

    Latino Community Foundation of Colorado

    Mr. Martinez is the president/CEO of the Latino Community Foundation of Colorado (LCFC). He directs the LCFC’s efforts to expand philanthropy by Latinos, advance the foundation’s vision of building the civic power of Latinos in Colorado and oversees the foundation’s work in building a vibrant narrative for the Latino community of Colorado. 

    Mr. Martinez has held various executive positions and led the transformation of several non-profit organizations in Colorado, California and Massachusetts. In additional, he has also worked in philanthropy at the executive level and is creative in developing philanthropic engagement opportunities for individuals, foundations and corporations that translate into strategic investments in community for wide-reaching impact. He is an advocate of leadership programs and has been instrumental in the development and teaching of several non-profit local and national programs as well as been an adjunct professor on management/leadership courses.

    Natalie Roetzel Ossenfort

    Director, Texas Office

    Alliance for Justice

    Natalie Ossenfort is the director of Alliance for Justice's Texas office, where she works with nonprofits and foundations to build their capacity to advocate both lawfully and effectively. Prior to her work with the organization, she helped to create and run the Innocence Project of Texas, a nonprofit dedicated to freeing those wrongfully convicted of crimes in the state. At IPTX, Natalie held both executive director and chief staff attorney positions, and she specialized in the litigation of cases involving the use of DNA evidence. She also worked with the organization to successfully advocate on behalf of reforms designed to reduce the number of wrongful convictions and assist those reentering society after lengthy terms of unjust confinement. Natalie obtained her law degree from the Texas Wesleyan University School of Law in Fort Worth, Texas. She earned her undergraduate B.A. from Trinity University in San Antonio, where she majored in political science.

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Knowledge Management: Capture and apply knowledge to promote learning and improvement.
    • Strategic Management: Promote organizational mission and goals and inspire colleagues to achieve them.

  • Implementing Equitable Grantmaking Practices

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Forget best practices. Well, at least set them aside for now. Many of those practices could support the status quo. If we were to design the grantmaking process to contribute to a more just and equitable world, what would that look like? This session will identify the types of grantmaking practices that support—or hinder—equity. Participate in a design-thinking exercise to prepare to lead change inside an organization.

    Participants will learn about:

    Practices that support more equitable grantmaking

    Overcoming organizational barriers to change

    Possible next steps toward greater alignment between grantmaking practices and the values of diversity, equity, and inclusion

    Melissa Sines

    Programs and Knowledge Director

    PEAK Grantmaking

    Melissa leads PEAK Grantmaking’s work to identify effective, efficient, and equitable philanthropic practices and advocate for their adoption by grantmakers.

    Prior to joining PEAK Grantmaking, Melissa was the education and accreditation director at Maryland Nonprofits and the Standards for Excellence Institute, where she oversaw nonprofit accreditation and the association’s learning community.

    Melissa is currently a board member at the Maryland Center for Economic Policy. She also serves as co-chair for the United Philanthropy Forum's Program Committee and on the Funder's Planning Committee for the Frederick County Nonprofit Summit. She has served on committees for Independent Sector, the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers, the Frederick Giving Project, and numerous other nonprofits in her local community.

    Melissa is a self-professed nonprofit dork and accidental techie. She is passionate about organizing people and projects to promote social justice.

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Promote diversity, equity, and inclusion in grantmaking practices.
    • Process and Change Management: Plan and monitor processes efficiently and effectively and manage change as needed to contribute to grantmaker's strategic goals and grantee's success.

  • Navigating Faith and Regulation: Compliance and Competency in Religious Grantmaking

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    Session materials from PEAK2019.

    In 2017, 75 percent of all giving in the United States was directed to houses of worship or religious-oriented charities. According to the Giving USA Special Report on Religion, religious motivation not only serves as the basis for many philanthropic decisions but also as one of the strongest predictors of charitable giving across all non-profit subsectors. Despite religion’s important role in charitable giving, many secular foundations shy away from making grants to religious organizations due to the ambiguity around determining whether houses of worship or other religious organizations are considered charities for federal tax purposes. Explore tactics for reaching a broader and more diverse community of grantees by including religious organizations. Identify strategies for minimizing risk in faith-based giving. Hear about the experience of a leading, national faith-based grantmaker in developing due diligence for religious institutions.

    Participants will learn about:

    The IRS definition of church structure and 14 characteristics of a house of worship or religious-oriented charity

    Practices that allow foundations to meet IRS regulations for grants to faith-based organizations

    Tips for addressing due-diligence scenarios in religious grantmaking, e.g. group exemptions, independent congregations, and individual missionary support

    Kaitlin Ostlie

    Grants Associate

    InFaith Community Foundation

    Kaitlin Ostlie started her career in philanthropy working for the Minnesota Council on Foundations in 2011. In late 2014, she joined InFaith Community Foundation team as their grants associate where she is responsible for supporting all grantmaking activities across the Foundation, including due diligence and compliance for grants from donor advised funds and community foundation initiatives. During her time at InFaith, Kaitlin has helped streamline the grantmaking process, implemented and improved due diligence procedures for church and church-affiliated grantees, and provided project management for grant initiatives. Kaitlin received her B.A. in East Asian Studies and Anthropology from Hamline University in Saint Paul, Minnesota, and is an active member of the PEAK Grantmaking Minnesota Steering Committee.

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Promote diversity, equity, and inclusion in grantmaking practices.
    • Strategic Management: Promote organizational mission and goals and inspire colleagues to achieve them.

  • Operationalizing a Focus on Equity

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Session materials for PEAK2019.

    Session materials for PEAK2019.

    Recently, many foundations have increased their focus on the issue of equity—changing their grantmaking priorities and program areas, engaging in listening tours, and pooling resources to advance one of the most important issues of our time. In the end, however, just changing what grantmakers fund will not be enough. We also need to change how grantmakers fund, if we want to move the needle on equity. We will never achieve our goals with outdated grantmaking practices and policies that neglect investments in capacity and infrastructure. When funding doesn’t cover the full cost of delivering programs, nonprofits close the gap through sweat equity; they overwork and underpay their people, relying on volunteer and in-kind support. How can funders adapt their application processes, due diligence work, and overall grantmaking approach to better support impact without exploiting the sweat equity of their grantees? Engage in a dialogue on revitalizing grantmaking to better support equity goals.

    Participants will learn about:

    The value of the how and the why, when applying an equity lens to grantmaking

    Adapting application, due diligence, and grants management processes to better support equity outcomes

    The capacity and business needs of community-based organizations serving economically and socially disadvantaged communities

    David Greco

    President and CEO

    Social Sector Partners

    David Greco is a nationally recognized speaker, author and consultant on creating a more sustainable and effective social sector. He brings more than 25 years of experience in in driving the growth and impact of social sector organizations. In 2013, David founded Social Sector Partners to provide training and capacity building support to funders and nonprofits to develop a culture of sustainability that incorporates real cost, sustainable business models, and a focus on impact. 

    He is a professor with Pepperdine University in the Master in Arts in Social Entrepreneurship and Change program and the author of "Think Money! Ending the Culture of Scarcity and Achieving Real Impact."

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Promote diversity, equity, and inclusion in grantmaking practices.

  • Data Is Not Enough: How Learning Drives Impact

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Becoming a learning organization is a hugely challenging process for many organizations though. It involves data, technology, culture, processes, people. In this webinar we will introduce concepts to help move your organization towards becoming a learning culture. We will talk about how all these elements must fit together and work towards a culture that values learning. Original air date: February 12, 2019

    In order for us to be more impactful organizations, we need to be reflective and learn how to do our work better. Becoming a learning organization is a hugely challenging process for many organizations though. It involves data, technology, culture, processes, people. In this webinar we will introduce concepts to help move your organization towards becoming a learning culture. We will talk about how all these elements must fit together and work towards a culture that values learning.

    Participants will learn the:

    • Framework to move from data to insight to action
    • Common pitfalls for creating a learning organization
    • Ideas to create a culture of evidence

    Original air date: February 12, 2019

    ​Andrew Means

    Founder

    Big Elephant Studios

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Process and Change Management: Plan and monitor processes efficiently and effectively and manage change as needed to contribute to grantmaker's strategic goals and grantee's success.
    • Staff and Volunteer Development: Build the capacity of all staff and volunteers to be successful in their grantmaking role.
    • Technology Management: Apply technology solutions to grantmaking to support grantmaker, applicant, and grantee success.


  • Empowerment in the Midst of Change

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    When faced with unexpected changes, we can find ourselves feeling out of control, anxious, frustrated, or resentful. These feelings come from our belief that we are losing the power to choose what is best for us. What if there was another way to see unexpected changes in our lives that allow us to take our power back without making anyone wrong in the process? Learn how we can shift our beliefs in ways that allow us to generate everything we need to succeed and be fully empowerment in the middle of ongoing change. Original air date: January 15, 2019

    What is it that makes it so difficult for us to navigate changes that we did not initiate? When faced with unexpected changes, we can find ourselves feeling out of control, anxious, frustrated, or resentful. These feelings come from our belief that we are losing the power to choose what is best for us.  What if there was another way to see unexpected changes in our lives that allow us to take our power back without making anyone wrong in the process?  Learn how we can shift our beliefs in ways that allow us to generate everything we need to succeed and be fully empowerment in the middle of ongoing change.

    Participants of this webinar will:

    • Identify and change the inner story we tell ourselves when we feel we have no choice
    • Set and honor our limits with others in ways that are respectful to us and them
    • Get what we want and need and no longer give from ‘obligation’ to others

    Original air date: January 15, 2019

    ​Wendy Watson-Hallowell

    Belief Coach

    BeliefWorks

    Wendy is passionate about enabling individuals, organizations and communities to value themselves and each other in the ongoing process of change. She has guided hundreds of individuals and over 750+ public and private sector organizations to achieve tangible increases in impact and performance. Wendy’s skills have been honed in leadership and mentoring roles at MTV Networks, The Rensselaerville Institute, and the nonprofit she runs in her town. In 2015 she became The Belief Coach and offers Belief Coaching as a way to address the root cause of what limits the results we can achieve both personally and professionally. This is an 'upstream' solution to change. Instead of changing limiting behavior, she focuses on changing the limiting beliefs that drive that behavior. In all cases, her clients and partners speak to the specific increases in achievement that her consulting, coaching and partnership roles make possible.

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Process and Change Management: Plan and monitor processes efficiently and effectively and manage change as needed to contribute to grantmaker's strategic goals and grantee's success.
    • Staff and Volunteer Development: Build the capacity of staff and volunteers to be successful in their grantmaking role.
  • 11 Trends in Philanthropy for 2019: Anticipate and Embrace What’s Next

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Experts and thought leaders from the Dorothy A. Johnson Center for Philanthropy — along with several members of our Leadership Council — have examined changes in the field and identified 11 trends in philanthropy we expect to see impacting our sector in 2019. Publication date: January 2019

    Giving in the United States has now topped $400 billion. Countless community and national organizations are benefiting from a surge in public interest and a growing conviction that renewing our democracy will require that we work together. The entire ecosystem of philanthropy — nonprofits, foundations, donors, and volunteers — is rallying to the cause of civil society and cross-sector collaboration.

    Yet, the challenges we face are formidable. They require concrete, data-driven strategies and a willingness to experiment, evaluate, and adjust. They require that we keep moving forward.

    Experts and thought leaders from the Dorothy A. Johnson Center for Philanthropy — along with several members of our Leadership Council — have examined changes in the field and identified 11 trends in philanthropy we expect to see impacting our sector in 2019.

    These trends cover a range of topics, from a marked growth in nonprofit media, to a downturn in religiosity, to ongoing uncertainty about the impact of 2017’s Tax Cuts and Jobs Act on the nonprofit sector. These “11 Trends in Philanthropy for 2019” will help you anticipate and embrace what’s next.

    Publication date: January 2019

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Process and Change Management: Plan and monitor processes efficiently and effectively and manage change as needed to contribute to grantmaker's strategic goals and grantee's success.
    • Strategic Management: Promote organizational mission and goals and inspire colleagues to achieve them.

  • Using Online Donations to Strengthen Philanthropy in China

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    There is no single path to successful digital philanthropy in China, but a new study provides six questions that stakeholders should ask themselves as they begin to develop their strategies. Publication date: January 22, 2019

    There is no single path to successful digital philanthropy in China, but a new study provides six questions that stakeholders should ask themselves as they begin to develop their strategies.

    Publication date:  January 22, 2019

    Ming Wong

    Vice President of Asia Pacific

    United Way Worldwide

    Yin Chen

    Partner

    Bain & Company

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Process and Change Management: Plan and monitor processes efficiently and effectively and manage change as needed to contribute to grantmaker's strategic goals and grantee's success.
    • Technology Management: Apply technology solutions to grantmaking to support grantmaker, applicant, and grantee success.

  • Sharing Data Responsibly – A Conversation Guide for Funders

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Human rights funders collect a lot of data about their grantees – as well as the people that their grantees help. Sharing this data openly can help funders be transparent about their activities and highlight the impact of their grantees’ work. However, it can also increase risks to human rights work if data isn’t collected and managed responsibly. How can funders be transparent about the work they support, while making sure that they aren’t harming grantees or others? This guide is based on research conducted by Ariadne and The Engine Room. Publication date: October 2018

    Human rights funders collect a lot of data about their grantees – as well as the people that their grantees help. Sharing this data openly can help funders be transparent about their activities and highlight the impact of their grantees’ work. However, it can also increase risks to human rights work if data isn’t collected and managed responsibly. How can funders be transparent about the work they support, while making sure that they aren’t harming grantees or others?

    This guide is based on research conducted by Ariadne and The Engine Room.

    Publication date: October 2018

    Grants Management Professional Competency Model

    Cross-Cutting Competencies

    • Communications: Listen to others and communicate effectively.